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[News] VP assembly code demo for the skepticsANN.lu
Posted on 05-Nov-2000 22:28 GMT by Teemu I. Yliselš14 comments
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Daniel Robbins explains VP assembly to the sceptics in the latest addition to the series of articles he's written for the IBM developerWorks website.

VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 1 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by nOM^ on 04-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
Good reading .. esp the link to the interview Robin had with Bill and Fleecy
VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 2 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by Dave Mountford on 05-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
I'm learning to program in C, and I got lost somewhere in the middle there. Do you have to have a decent understanding of ASM to be able to program in VP?
VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 3 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by Olivier Fabre on 05-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
In reply to Comment 2 (Dave Mountford):
Well, since VP code *is* ASM, of course you need to understand ASM... :p
VP looks like a mix between C/C++ and ASM to me.. I happen to know both C and 68k asm but I think that the article contains enough information by itself to understand the VP example.. If there is something precise you don't understand, just ask ;) (I don't know if I'll be able to answer, but someone else probably will...)
VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 4 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by Graham on 05-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
VP Coding looks like fun to me. Will have to get a copy of the SDK at some point to do some application programming, if I can free up some free time in my schedule.
Of course, I will wait until Amiga released a version of the SDK which has decent graphical interface libraries, as I love designing application GUIs (for some strange twisted reason). I wonder what I could write that won't duplicate the effort of 50 other people (I can imagine 30 different simple text editors on release :-) ).
I hope the Amiga have got a decent set of regulations concerning application GUI design - e.g., standard menus, shortcut keys, layout of window internals etc. A GUI IDE designer is also essential in the short term.
VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 5 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by Paul Heams on 05-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
In reply to Comment 4 (Graham):
I second your comments concerning the GUI, style guide etc. Lets hope we
get some more details soon. I program in several different languages and
VP is certainly my favourite at the moment! It's very easy to get to grips
with, powerful and of course the end result will run on totally different
processors / platforms. A huge step towards writing once and running
everywhere!
VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 6 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by Ian on 06-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
In reply to Comment 2 (Dave Mountford):
> I'm learning to program in C, and I got lost somewhere in the middle there.
> Do you have to have a decent understanding of ASM to be able to program in VP?
I'm as new to this as anyone else, so don't take this as gospel...
AFAICT, the VP code is simply what is shipped to the end user. There is no reason why a C compiler couldn't be written to compile into VP code. In fact I can't imagine many people coding serious apps entirely in Asm. I suppose its a bit like Java bytecode.
VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 7 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by Spudley on 06-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
This is a great article. It takes the form of a basic-level tutuorial of VP.
After reading this article, I feel like I could write a reasonable program in VP, and I would enjoy writing it. He's sold me on the language, and that's no mean feat for an assembly language!
Definitely time to go out and buy that new Amiga-capable linux box I've been promising myself... :-)
VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 8 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by Olivier Fabre on 06-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
In reply to Comment 6 (Ian):
"The SDK easily compiles C/C++ into native code that will run on any hardware platform that the new Amiga OS supports."
(from http://www.amiga.com/products/SDK.shtml)
VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 9 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by Ian on 06-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
In reply to Comment 8 (Olivier Fabre):
> "The SDK easily compiles C/C++ into native code that will run on any hardware
> platform that the new Amiga OS supports."
Hmm.. That sounds more like "we are including compilers for x86 and any other cpu the SDK is written to support."
I don't read that as having a compiler which creates VP code.
OTOH, as I said earlier, I feel there will be some means of doing so because it would be insane not to. :-/
VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 10 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by Olivier Fabre on 06-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
In reply to Comment 9 (Ian):
Oh well, you're right, it is written "native code" and not "VP code"... But from the second part of the sentence, I suppose that the C/C++ compiler indeed creates VP code..
It's probably mentionned on Tao site..
VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 11 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by Olivier Fabre on 06-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
In reply to Comment 10 (Olivier Fabre):
Hm :)
Just had a look on http://tao-group.com and saw this :
o C Compiler
The Tao C compiler is a full port of the GNU C compiler. The Compiler produces Virtual Processor binary code via the Tao VP Assembler and runs under the Elate OS.
o C++ Compiler
The C++ compiler is a full implementation of the GNU C++ compiler hosted by the Elate Operating System and produces Virtual Processor binary code.
They are also providing assemblers and disassemblers for VP code AND every processor supported.
(from http://tao-group.com/2/tao/elate/env.html)
VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 12 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by Dave Mountford on 07-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
This from the previous article:
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
dW: Does the included GNU C compiler compile into VP code?
Moss: It's a two-stage process: The C compiler actually compiles into VP source code that is then assembled into VP object code. One of the differences of coding in C as opposed to VP is that you're at the mercy of how it translates C into VP [which means the C compiler produces one big tool, similar to a traditional monolithic executable, so your code isn't composed of many tiny lightweight tools like the rest of the system.] Doom was ported from the open, available C sources in 15 minutes, and I think Quake took about an hour or two hours. It has full ANSI-C compliance. The people who have used VP so far have said that they really like it, but sometimes they get a bit confused because things seem C-like and Linux-like, and yet they're not. So there's a bit of a learning curve to it, but it's not much -- these people are all over it. Because initially we saw everyone say, "We're only using C," and a lot of them said, "No way, we're not coding in assembler," and then they see it and fall in love. And they're actually using VP more.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Well I think I'm one of those "No way! I'm not coding in ASM" people! :)
VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 13 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by Ian on 07-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
In reply to Comment 11 (Olivier Fabre):
Well, that lot sounds like it covers all bases. :-)
Nice!
VP assembly code demo for the skeptics : Comment 14 of 14ANN.lu
Posted by Ian on 07-Nov-2000 23:00 GMT
In reply to Comment 12 (Dave Mountford):
> Well I think I'm one of those "No way! I'm not coding in ASM" people! :)
Heh! Well, I'll vote for "I love Asm except for coding GUI's" :-)
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