28-Oct-2021 09:10 GMT.
UNDER CONSTRUCTION
Anonymous, there are 15 items in your selection
[News] New logos for the Commodore 64 by IronstoneANN.lu
Posted on 09-Aug-2003 08:06 GMT by Raffaele15 comments
View flat
View list
Ironstone, the firm chosen by Tulip Computer to became the new 'patron saint' of all the patents of "Commodore 64" unveils on THIS SITE the new logos of Commodore 64. I forwarded the news from Amigart.com.
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 1 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by Anonymous on 09-Aug-2003 06:49 GMT
Why are not all edges of the logo rounded? :) ggr...

But anyway, Commodore 64!? Are they planning to start
manufacturing C64s or what is the point of designing
a new C64 logo? Oh, well... Retro anyway ;)
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 2 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by Peter Gordon on 09-Aug-2003 07:08 GMT
In reply to Comment 1 (Anonymous):
Well, I could give you a direct link to the tulip story on this subject, but because its also reported on my own website, i'm going to link there and get a free plug here :-)

http://www.videobrewery.com/shownews.php?newsid=9
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 3 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by 3seas on 09-Aug-2003 15:23 GMT
How long before patents expire?????
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 4 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by 3seas on 09-Aug-2003 15:33 GMT
In reply to Comment 1 (Anonymous):
hardware is plenty fast enough today that emulation in software is all they need.Tulip is a branding company as far as the C64 goes, they collect royalities on anything that uses the trademark..... That's all.This also means they want money for any use of the C=One as a C64. That's how they intend to help... (double speak... meaning helping themselves to the value others create, cause they own the trademark)
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 5 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by CodeSmith on 09-Aug-2003 22:27 GMT
In reply to Comment 3 (3seas):
In the USA, something like 70 years after the guy who patented the thing expires. Dunno about Europe, but I suspect it's less time over there.
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 6 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by Xeyes on 09-Aug-2003 23:51 GMT
In reply to Comment 5 (CodeSmith):
That's copyright, not patent.

Patents issued since June 8, 1995 expire 20 years from the date of application with the payment of maintenance fees.

Patents issued prior to June 8, 1995 expire 17 years from the date of issue with the payment of maintenance fees.
Design patent expire 14 years from the date of issue.

Patents are not renewable. Under special circumstances, a patent term may be extended.
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 7 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by Xeyes on 09-Aug-2003 23:53 GMT
In reply to Comment 6 (Xeyes):
With that in mind, it's interesting to note that the patent on the original Amiga is expired.
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 8 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by Xeyes on 09-Aug-2003 23:54 GMT
In reply to Comment 7 (Xeyes):
And the Commodore 64 too, for that matter.
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 9 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by EyeAm on 10-Aug-2003 05:19 GMT
In reply to Comment 7 (Xeyes):
Yes, they have, haven't they? >;-)
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 10 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by RC on 10-Aug-2003 10:33 GMT
Trademarks are renewable. Tulip owns the trademark for Europe and the USA. The ccopyrights are also still in effect for the ROMs, etc. Copyright is the life of author plus 100 years. Therefore, so long as there is still a Commodore company, the copyright is still in effect. If Tulip goes bust and no-one buys the rights to Commodore, then it will still be 100 years before anyone could (legally) use the copyrighted software/documents.

I don't recall patents on any of the Commodore 64 hardware at all.
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 11 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by Raffaele on 10-Aug-2003 15:52 GMT
In reply to Comment 10 (RC):
Mr. RC wrote:

>Trademarks are renewable.

Yes, but not over certain amount of time it may vary from state to state...

You know. It is intended to give the inventors a good amount of time to benefit from their invention &/or particular method of production &/or chemical process.

One example?

Aspirin.

Bayer still owns trademark (ONLY THE NAME, intended as the name of a product into the market), but chemical process to produce aspirin is free, so other firms can produce it under other names.

>Copyright is the life of author plus 100 years

Wrong. Copyrights are intended to protect the genius of an author and his direct descendance.

It amounts to 50 years AFTER the death in Europe and in USA.

Not anymore than 50 years...

Some months ago Parliament of USA extended this right upto 80 years.

Sad to know it was made to accomplish requests from a powerful lobby.

***** DISNEY INC. *****
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 12 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by Gareth Knight on 11-Aug-2003 07:04 GMT
In reply to Comment 11 (Raffaele):
>***** DISNEY INC. *****

A Mickey Mouse company! By pushing these changes into law they have restricted fair use of all the other work of the time period that would have fallen into the public domain.
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 13 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by Peter Gordon on 11-Aug-2003 09:02 GMT
In reply to Comment 12 (Gareth Knight):
It seems that the big companies write the lawbooks these days, for the benefit of themselves rather than the people :(
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 14 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by Joe "Floid" Kanowitz on 11-Aug-2003 12:33 GMT
In reply to Comment 10 (RC):
> Trademarks are renewable. Tulip owns the trademark for Europe and the USA. The
> ccopyrights are also still in effect for the ROMs, etc. Copyright is the life
> of author plus 100 years. Therefore, so long as there is still a Commodore
> company, the copyright is still in effect. If Tulip goes bust and no-one buys
> the rights to Commodore, then it will still be 100 years before anyone could
> (legally) use the copyrighted software/documents.

We should remember that, in practical terms, this is a pretty 'modern' problem. At least in the US, the courts (and/or law enforcement) only really get involved when someone complains, and in the old days, if things went bust, either nobody was left to complain, or it'd be pretty clearcut in terms of authors, patentholders, etc.

Meanwhile, it'd have been rare for someone to want to associate with a failed enterprise (there weren't 'platforms' to resurrect back then), so that sort of thing would be straightened out with relative ease.

So, uh... Gotta love living the 21st century, huh?
New logos for the Commodore 64 by Ironstone : Comment 15 of 15ANN.lu
Posted by Nomad of Norad on 11-Aug-2003 18:41 GMT
Well, if you want to do something about this increase-the-copyright-period-to-rediculous-lengths thing, you might try going here:

http://www.petitiononline.com/eldred/petition.html

ALOT of people have been participating in THIS one. Looks like it REALLY hit a nerve! :-D

NoN
Anonymous, there are 15 items in your selection
Back to Top