21-Oct-2021 17:34 GMT.
UNDER CONSTRUCTION
Anonymous, there are 35 items in your selection
[News] John Dvorak's article about MorphOSANN.lu
Posted on 08-Mar-2004 10:01 GMT by pixie35 comments
View flat
View list
In the latest issue of US PC Magazine, John C. Dvorak makes a reference to MorphOS and explains some concepts behynd it. Read more about it at:
MorphOS article in PCMagazine (Update) as seen @ MorphOS-News.de
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 1 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Peter Gordon on 08-Mar-2004 09:10 GMT
Much of the intellectual property from the original box went from hand to hand and ended up at Gateway, where it’s apparently in a locker someplace, lost, I think.

Nice to see well researched journalism ;)
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 2 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Darth_X on 08-Mar-2004 09:15 GMT
In reply to Comment 1 (Peter Gordon):
That sounds more like sarcasm. ;)

But being 'lost' to Gateway is fairly accurate.. they sure aren't doing anything with the technology.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 3 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by pixie on 08-Mar-2004 09:19 GMT
In reply to Comment 1 (Peter Gordon):
I for myself liked the most when he said:
"It’s a community-based movement, which means that everything’s free. Tools are free, the OS is free, applications that cost money for other OSs are free for MorphOS."
This could induce wrongly the end user, but do *we* care having more users?
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 4 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Peter Gordon on 08-Mar-2004 09:39 GMT
In reply to Comment 2 (Darth_X):
They licensed it out to a third party who has subcontractors making use of them. Thats not "lost in a locker", the implication being that there is nothing happening with them...

Anyway, that aside, it was an interesting article, and a nice bit of PR for MorphOS.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 5 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Don Cox on 08-Mar-2004 09:53 GMT
In reply to Comment 1 (Peter Gordon):
"Much of the intellectual property from the original box went from hand to hand and ended up at Gateway, where it’s apparently in a locker someplace, lost, I think.

Nice to see well researched journalism ;)"

Well, Amiga Inc did say they wanted to stay under the radar. Looks like they have succeeded.

Let's hope this publicity translates to more sales for the Pegasos.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 6 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Darth_X on 08-Mar-2004 10:04 GMT
In reply to Comment 4 (Peter Gordon):
With the Microsoft threat over, Gateway could easily resurrect AmigaInc from their fiancial troubles and bring "thebrand" back.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 7 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Anonymous on 08-Mar-2004 10:04 GMT
I wonder what that guy will write when OS 4 is out ;)
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 8 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Darth_X on 08-Mar-2004 10:33 GMT
In reply to Comment 7 (Anonymous):
"Are these guys serious?" ;)
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 9 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Darth_X on 08-Mar-2004 10:41 GMT
In reply to Comment 8 (Darth_X):
Many of us are sitting here wondering if OS4 is planned to be a serious product for release on the open market or just a 2000 member club kit?
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 10 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Don Cox on 08-Mar-2004 11:17 GMT
In reply to Comment 9 (Darth_X):
"Many of us are sitting here wondering if OS4 is planned to be a serious product for release on the open market or just a 2000 member club kit?"

You will find the answer to that if you listen to one of Alan Redhouse's recent speeches at various AOS$ demos.

He is just as serious about selling to markets outside the current Amiga community as BBRV. IMO there is a big market out there with plenty of room for both, although it may not take off until they offer 9xx based hardware.

The product, as with Apple, is the hardware. The OSes are there to make the hardware useful, not as a product to sell separately. Genesi sell the Pegasos, MorphOS comes free.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 11 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Johan Rönnblom on 08-Mar-2004 11:29 GMT
The Dvorak article is obviously not quite based in reality. :-)

Dvorak can be interesting though. For example, he claims the shutdown
of Napster was the beginning of the end for the music industry, as
this means now people no longer have a way to find out what music
they'd like to buy. Of course you could nitpick about that too
(talking about p2p software for example), but I think he does have a
point. I hope that's the case for this article as well. ;-)
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 12 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Jupp3 on 08-Mar-2004 11:38 GMT
In reply to Comment 11 (Johan Rönnblom):
>For example, he claims the shutdown of Napster was the beginning of the end for the music industry, as this means now people no longer have a way to find out what music they'd like to buy.

Well, that (Napster shutdown) DID happen, but there are many other (better) p2p solutions available (such as mldonkey)

And CD's still sell, but less than earlier, partly becouse of p2p, but I strongly believe that partly becouse of "copy protection technologies" aswell...

Hope they will some day learn that many people will rather have free, working, illegal copy than expensive, non-working, legal one...
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 13 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Peg2 on 08-Mar-2004 11:50 GMT
It's a payed advertisement, nothing special... Not the first one, and I think not the last one. We need it.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 14 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Darth_X on 08-Mar-2004 11:58 GMT
In reply to Comment 11 (Johan Rönnblom):
"he claims the shutdown
of Napster was the beginning of the end for the music industry, as
this means now people no longer have a way to find out what music
they'd like to buy. "

I agree with this, because this is how I decide what CDs I want to buy.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 15 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Anonymous on 08-Mar-2004 12:22 GMT
In reply to Comment 14 (Darth_X):
Amazing, I just turn the radio on.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 16 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Peter Gordon on 08-Mar-2004 12:35 GMT
In reply to Comment 15 (Anonymous):
Not everyone likes the kind of music mainstream radio stations play...
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 17 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Alan LM Buxey on 08-Mar-2004 12:43 GMT
applications that cost money for other OSs are free for MorphOS.

Cool! I've never wanted to pay for QuarkExpress or RealAudio Server. ;-)
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 18 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Anonymous on 08-Mar-2004 12:56 GMT
In reply to Comment 16 (Peter Gordon):
Then listen to the internet streaming radio stations...
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 19 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by hooligan/dcs on 08-Mar-2004 13:58 GMT
In reply to Comment 12 (Jupp3):
"And CD's still sell, but less than earlier"

I doubt thats true. I think cd's sell more and more every year.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 20 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Peter Gordon on 08-Mar-2004 14:08 GMT
In reply to Comment 19 (hooligan/dcs):
I read somewhere that sales grew 5% in the UK, in a year when the RIAA was lamenting poor CD sales, and the US happened to be having a rough time with the economy... (hmmm! :)

I can think of 6 albums i've purchased as a direct result of having access to Audiogalaxy (when it was still working). I can only think of ONE album I haven't bought because I downloaded it on mp3, and I fully intend to buy that one (and another by the same band) in the near future. I wouldn't have even heard of the band otherwise...
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 21 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by MIKE on 08-Mar-2004 14:17 GMT
In reply to Comment 14 (Darth_X):
Yea, I watch MTV or listen to the radio? Why should I buy a CD with as song on it I like, if I've already downloaded the MP3? That is the reality of the situation, no matter how much folks try to justify the piracy to clear their conscience. The music isn't very good right now, that's the primary reason for the sales dropoffs, although the ease of music availability through the internet isn't helping things.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 22 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Ole-Egil on 08-Mar-2004 14:58 GMT
In reply to Comment 21 (MIKE):
I don't download mp3s, but then I don't buy CDs either.
Reason? Too much crap to wade through to find any good music.

But:
I used to download a lot of movies, now I own them on DVD instead. I figure that if it's worth it to watch, it's worth it to own. Unfortunately that means I now have a rapidly expanding DVD collection :-)

Hmm, I have a couple of movies still wrapped in plastic, maybe it's time to watch some DVD? :-P
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 23 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by MarkTime on 08-Mar-2004 15:28 GMT
Dvorak is a moron.

there are so many problems with what he has said, I'm not going to bother.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 24 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Johan Rönnblom on 08-Mar-2004 15:31 GMT
Before Napster/Audiogalaxy, I didn't buy any CD's at all. The mp3
revolution really changed that, making me buy 3-4 albums per month
for some years. Now I'm mostly back into not buying anything again. If
I do find something to buy it would probably be via internet radio,
but that's not really efficient.. you have to find some station which
plays something you like, and then you have to listen for hours, and
stay alert to see if there's something new that you like.

P2P is good for mainstream stuff or sharing things with people you
already know, but it doesn't come near what was offered through
Napster or especially AG. I think it will get there, though, so
I'm still optimistic.

I disagree with Dvorak on one issue though, and that's that the record
companies are killing themselves. The thing is that this is the huge
labels, and they get their artists played in the mainstream media
anyway, so people who want that can get it anyway. I think that we're
definitely going towards more individual choices of music, and *that*
is what is killing the big labels since they rely on economy-of-scale
in marketing and selling the same stuff to everyone.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 25 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Amon_Re on 08-Mar-2004 17:58 GMT
In reply to Comment 16 (Peter Gordon):
Fellow metalhead or one of them technofreaks? ;)

Cheers
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 26 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Peter Gordon on 08-Mar-2004 19:01 GMT
In reply to Comment 25 (Amon_Re):
Metal :)
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 27 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Sigbjørn Skjæret on 08-Mar-2004 19:09 GMT
In reply to Comment 22 (Ole-Egil):
"I used to download a lot of movies, now I own them on DVD instead. I figure that if it's worth it to watch, it's worth it to own."

One does not exclude the other (atleast not for me)...

For many people downloading is a good way to filter out the crap without wasting hard-earned money on it (and basing your choices on reviews is not very reliable, as your taste will invariably differ) .. atleast I do most of the time go to the cinemas to see a great movie, even though I might have seen it via other means first, simply because the cinema often is a much better experience (except when there's a bunch of annoying kids making alot of noise), and I always buy the DVD when it's out (I have *alot* of DVDs now (and I'm the kind of guy that goes through *all* the extras (yes, even all the commentary tracks). ;) ))...

Infact, I'm willing to claim that filesharing has created alot more conscious consumers (I guess this is what they are afraid of, there's nothing worse than not being able to sell that last case of rotten apples), and yes, I'm also aware that it has opened up a whole new arena for freeloaders as well, but I doubt it has created too many new freeloaders.

..but one thing I have found filesharing *really* useful for is finding those extremely hard-to-get things, the things you have been searching the shops in your half of the hemisphere for, without luck, things that might not even be available in any shops anywhere, this is where you can really luck out then!

Oh, and ofcourse, one has to make this perfectly clear .. P2P is not synonymous with illegal activities! There are alot of legitimate uses for P2P, P2P in itself is just an efficient (ok, sometimes it can suck. ;) ) method of distributing something (can be anything, like the latest Linux distro, a funny short you made with your friends, etc) by spreading the bandwidth load between several peers .. you cannot blame technology for what some might chose to do with it, something MPAA and RIAA don't seem to realize...


- CISC
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 28 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by itix on 08-Mar-2004 19:37 GMT
In reply to Comment 16 (Peter Gordon):
"Not everyone likes the kind of music mainstream radio stations play..." AmiNetRadio is your best friend ;)
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 29 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Don Cox on 09-Mar-2004 07:54 GMT
In reply to Comment 28 (itix):
""Not everyone likes the kind of music mainstream radio stations play..."

AmiNetRadio is your best friend ;)"

The BBC stations provide full playlists for most programmes, including the number of the CD, so it is easy to buy a legal copy of something you like. Listening to the "Late Junction" programme, for instance, can get quite expensive.

Unfortunately the BBC don't do shoutcast, so you need a PC if you want to listen over the Internet. I don't know if Linux works or only Windows.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 30 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Alkis Tsapanidis on 09-Mar-2004 11:04 GMT
In reply to Comment 15 (Anonymous):
The...RADIO? Ok, I still have on lying around... can I find a Heavy Metal
station over here? Nope. If I did, would the songs they would play
reflect the quality of the whole record? Nope.
So far, so good... so what?
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 31 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Alkis Tsapanidis on 09-Mar-2004 11:06 GMT
In reply to Comment 18 (Anonymous):
I do that sometimes... It's not easy to find one playing a sample of something
you want to buy.
I personally have quite a CD collection. I almost reached the 600 barrier.
Most of those CDs were bought AFTER a good download...
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 32 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Alkis Tsapanidis on 09-Mar-2004 11:07 GMT
In reply to Comment 25 (Amon_Re):
Metalhead here:-)
JP Rule! ;-)
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 33 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Anonymous on 09-Mar-2004 14:58 GMT
In reply to Comment 32 (Alkis Tsapanidis):
Well I doubt that metal makes up much of the market, so go ahead and pirate oh I mean fileshare.
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 34 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by Mr. Anonymous on 11-Mar-2004 18:37 GMT
Well, you can tell he's never sat infront of a Peg/Mos computer. Someone probably passed him a website and he went "Oh, how quaint!".
John Dvorak's article about MorphOS : Comment 35 of 35ANN.lu
Posted by TTAmiga on 13-Mar-2004 08:30 GMT
In reply to Comment 34 (Mr. Anonymous):
At last someone else who noticed that Dvorak hasn't actually *seen* a real live machine running the OS:

>The new platform will surprise people. From what I'm told, it's fully USB 2.0– >compliant and plug-and-play–capable with everything out there.

>The first MorphOS systems are called A-Box machines, because they mimic the >Amiga. The next batch are nicknamed Q-Box, which is what we'll see when MorphOS >hits the U.S. The Q-Box uses a somewhat mystical Quark microkernel for the OS, >hence the Q. What you are reading here is about six months ahead of the wave, >so make a note. From the screen shots of the OS I've seen, I have to say that >it's as jazzy as you can get, and you can run Windows (or Mac OS X) in a >separate window if you need to use those pesky legacy apps.

As opposed to:

>That said, I witnessed the original emergence of the Amiga around 1984, after >two years of rumors. It was an incredibly hot box and could have been a >world-beater. Instead, Amiga sold itself to Commodore, where the company lost >its way and eventually died. Much of the intellectual property from the >original box went from hand to hand and ended up at Gateway, where it's >apparently in a locker someplace, lost, I think. This time may be different. So >far, I like what I see. For more information, check out www.morphos.net.
Anonymous, there are 35 items in your selection
Back to Top