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[Forum] Forum: Symbian Founder on Mobile SpaceANN.lu
Posted on 22-Jul-2004 07:17 GMT by Joe "Floid" Kanowitz8 comments
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For the other half a person who still thinks the phone market is in some way related to Amiga, The Register have an interesting interview with Colly Myers, former CEO. Is the general-purpose device really dead, or do people just suck at making them?

Oh yeah, Kyocera may have given the Cosmo a quiet send-off (Babelfish req'd) in April, too.
Forum: Symbian Founder on Mobile Space : Comment 1 of 8ANN.lu
Posted by Joe "Floid" Kanowitz on 22-Jul-2004 05:36 GMT
Serves me right for posting at 3AM. That was supposed to be 'former Symbian CEO,' but even that's not necessarily right. "former Managing Director of Psion," as the article says.
Forum: Symbian Founder on Mobile Space : Comment 2 of 8ANN.lu
Posted by Anonymous on 22-Jul-2004 16:28 GMT
two comments

1) I love my new Treo600. its just what a SmartPhone should be like!

2) Sporks are fantasic! ;-)
Forum: Symbian Founder on Mobile Space : Comment 3 of 8ANN.lu
Posted by Darth_X on 22-Jul-2004 18:15 GMT
From the interview..
He simply doesn't see a mass market for software. Instead, he thinks, most people will want "a lot of things you can get on the Internet on your phone translated as a service, piece by piece".

"For raw OS software there isn't a market - it will become a Java market; one where you can download and run applications everywhere." The data downloads market for ringtones is worth billions, but that's a service, he points out.


seems about right.
Forum: Symbian Founder on Mobile Space : Comment 4 of 8ANN.lu
Posted by Joe "Floid" Kanowitz on 23-Jul-2004 01:06 GMT
In reply to Comment 3 (Darth_X):
From the interview..
He simply doesn't see a mass market for software. Instead, he thinks, most people will want "a lot of things you can get on the Internet on your phone translated as a service, piece by piece".

"For raw OS software there isn't a market - it will become a Java market; one where you can download and run applications everywhere." The data downloads market for ringtones is worth billions, but that's a service, he points out.

seems about right.

--

The latter part does, and that's, of course, what will have anyone who *did* get impressed with intent banging his head against the wall.

As to the services market... He's obviously correct as far as that being where 'the money' is... and the upshot for all these 'platform' guys who smashed their brains against the problem for decades is that 'services' are a lot more obvious from the business end -- you can focus on revenue alone, and if the revenue stops coming in, you know it's time to pack up and move on.

Meanwhile, it's (obviously, I can only hope) arrogant to assume that's what the customer *always* wants... and amusing, to the extent that his service relies on it remaining a pain in the @$$ to use Google or Wikipedia from your hand. Do you call 1-900-WEATHER when you can get the task of querying NOAA.gov in 'free' or single-payment form?

How do you deliver IRC, ANN.lu, or the latest HomestarRunner 'translated as a service, piece by piece?' How about SSH, VNC or NX for IT professionals? Or streaming radio, to name the one IP-based 'entertainment medium' that actually sort of exists in usable form?

The sheer expense of mobile data masks a lot of it, at present; if you can't afford to watch the 30 second MTV clips (or whatever they're deploying over 3G in the western world right now), you're probably not going to take advantage of real streaming Internet TV outside the walled-garden -- especially because that doesn't exist yet, anyway (to the sound of more foreheads on brick) ... and even Skype (the happy, friendly alternative to SIP?) is too proprietary and weird to put the nail in the PSTN coffin just yet*...

...but if anyone ever finds a way to make it not_suck, can anyone say with a straight face that consumers won't beat a path to the solution that provides the "Metcalfe value" they actually want, without sucking them dry with less-than-micro payments, or eradicating all their data if they get into a billing dispute? Not that it'll have to be written in C++ to be such. ;)

--

*There's no good reason why Internet telephony (and the associated addressing problem) isn't as simple as using an email address... so given the way spam volumes have been 'training' that aspect of the network, let me hereby jam my tongue in my cheek and propose voice-over-email as the solution to VoIP -- one message per sample, of course, and if you don't pick up, the infrastructure is already there to 'take a message!'
Forum: Symbian Founder on Mobile Space : Comment 5 of 8ANN.lu
Posted by Ferry on 23-Jul-2004 06:12 GMT
In reply to Comment 3 (Darth_X):
Hmmmm....

"He simply doesn't see a mass market for software. Instead, he thinks, most people will want "a lot of things you can get on the Internet on your phone translated as a service, piece by piece".

"For raw OS software there isn't a market - it will become a Java market; one where you can download and run applications everywhere." The data downloads market for ringtones is worth billions, but that's a service, he points out.
"

sounds to me like

"Nobody will ever need more than 640 kB RAM"

"Download and run applications everywhere" with a pay-per-download service? I don't think so. It would be good to service providers if everyone were willing to pay, but that's not the case: remember Napster or every other P2P service?

On the other side, devices are getting more and more small, but with growing power and storage capacity. Everybody said "nah, digital cameras are expensive and low quality, they cannot compare to 'traditional' cameras" Well, that's not quite the situation today. Same for laptops: "very expensive and low powered compared to desktops" Well, now desktops are losing market share every day in favour of laptops, power is nearly the same, as well as prices.

And the same will happen with PDA-like devices, or all-in-one, general purpose devices: more power, more storage capacity, smaller size, more functionality. Imagine such a device, as powerfull as a laptop but with th size of a PDA or even a mobile phone, together with this device, or even with it integrated. Science has proven such "visionaries" to be wrong many, many times...

Saluditos,

Ferrán.
Forum: Symbian Founder on Mobile Space : Comment 6 of 8ANN.lu
Posted by Fabio Alemagna on 23-Jul-2004 17:03 GMT
In reply to Comment 5 (Ferry):
> "Download and run applications everywhere" with a pay-per-download service? I
> don't think so. It would be good to service providers if everyone were willing
> to pay, but that's not the case: remember Napster or every other P2P service?

You talk like if the 2 markets were one and the same, but the thing is they are not. The market we're talking about is the one where ring tones are sold at 1 EUR each, where java games are sold at 5 to 10 or more EUR each, and where short messages cost 1,310.72 EUR per MiB (in Italy, at least).
Forum: Symbian Founder on Mobile Space : Comment 7 of 8ANN.lu
Posted by Ferry on 23-Jul-2004 18:10 GMT
In reply to Comment 6 (Fabio Alemagna):
Hi Fabio.

What I undertood from the article that, according to that person, "raw OS software" has no future, because people want to pay for a "download everywhere" service. Download what? I think we're not talkink here about ringtones or little games, aimed at young people that usually don't pay the invoices -their parents do-, but about productive soft, aimed at professionals that will not want to pay for a software they need for their work every time they need it.

Of course, I can be mistaken...

Saluditos,

Ferrán
Forum: Symbian Founder on Mobile Space : Comment 8 of 8ANN.lu
Posted by Fabio Alemagna on 23-Jul-2004 19:43 GMT
In reply to Comment 7 (Ferry):
> What I undertood from the article that, according to that person, "raw OS
> software" has no future,

Yes, that's what he said.

> because people want to pay for a "download everywhere" service.

Hum, no, that's not what he said. Read the interview again, he said "download and run applications everywhere". He's talking about java applications versus native applications.

> Download what?

The applications or otherwise other services, which however aren't OS-specific. Or so he says.

> I think we're not talkink here about ringtones or little games,

He specifically meantions ring tones, and says that "the data downloads market for ringtones is worth billions".

> but about productive soft, aimed at professionals that will not want to pay
> for a software they need for their work every time they need it.

But he didn't say that. You don't pay it every time, you only pay it when you download it. Or so it appears by reading the interview.
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